Misleading Miss Verity – Review

verity

by Carolyn Miller

Series: Regency Brides: Daughters of Aynsley (Book 3)
Paperback: 352 pages
Publisher: Kregel Publications (November 26, 2019)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0825445914
ISBN-13: 978-0825445910

Purchase from Amazon

Verity Hatherleigh has a mind of her own—but her actions do not impress her viscount papa. When she gets into one scrape too many, he sends her off to the wilds of Scotland to rethink her headstrong ways.

Anthony Jardine relished his role as curate, but his new duties as laird of Dungally aren’t always to his liking. Though he thought his new inheritance would be a blessing, somehow he’s finding nothing but trouble on these estates. And the intelligent, compassionate, feisty lass who was sent to rusticate in his territory is one of the biggest problems. He’s falling in love with her, but she doesn’t share the faith that’s his foundation—not to mention he’s been lying to her about who he really is. For the truth-loving Verity, that may be unforgivable.

The tangled web these two have woven may spell disaster for their happiness—and for the tenants of Dungally.


verityquote2

Verity Hatherleigh is a hoyden who doesn’t believe in God.  She was raised by unbelieving parents and thinks of the Bible as a fairy tale. While Verity is intelligent and helpful to others, she is always getting into trouble and not living up to her mother’s expectations.

Anthony Jardine is a former curate who feels called to bring the gospel to those abroad. However, he is forced to return to Scotland and take on a new title after his cousin’s death. Anthony has a soft heart and he truly wants to help others.

“Despite his upbringing, despite the wretched condition of so many, he had come to renewed awareness that there truly was no difference between men, neither convict nor free, English nor native, that all men were considered equal in the sight of God, that all were loved by God.”

Verity and Anthony share a similar sense of humor, and they both hide who they really are.  They each want to be known for who they are instead of what they are. While I had some issues with Verity and Anthony’s “hopeful” truth, it shows they really are perfect for each other.

“I have found that those without a sense of humor invariably fail to understand those fortunate enough to possess one.”

Verity believes that she is a mistake because her parents wanted her to be a boy.  While Verity always seems bold and outspoken, she becomes incredibly vulnerable when she thinks about not being lovable.

“If God did see her heart, then He would see how cracked it was, fractured with disillusionment, disappointment, and rejection. She was a fool, a failure, a mistake, unloved by her parents, unloved by the only man she ever cared for. Ergo, Verity Hatherleigh was unlovable.”

As Verity shows, there are all matter of ways that people are drawn to God and finally accept Him into their lives. Some find God in the eye opening experiences and others come to Him in the quiet moments.

As humans, Verity and Anthony are both flawed.  Anthony knows that God looks at the outside, but he has a number of shallow outward thoughts about people that he has to work on.  Even after coming to God, Verity still struggles with honoring her parents while also obeying God.

“She possessed fire and spunk that Grandmama might applaud but so many others openly deplored. God couldn’t want her, too. Could He?”

The side characters were as well developed as the main characters and the story line was a unique one.

Readers don’t often get to see a story that includes South Wales during this time period.  I also liked reading more about Scotland during this time. Clearly Miller puts a lot of research into her books. The author’s note at the end is interesting and mentions the history that went into this book.

Misleading Miss Verity was the perfect conclusion to the Daughters of Aynsley series.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s